Today’s Future Now – Wearable Technology | The Daily Show


Technology: it’s in our homes
and in our cars, but why can’t it be in us? Well, now it can.
Ronny Chieng has more in his segment
Today’s Future Now. ♪ ♪ Thanks, Trevor. For years, we’ve mostly
just operated our technology with our hands and our fingers, like a bunch of cavemen or people from Michigan. We love to finger
our technology. We finger it all day long. But now “science” has found a way to get
our whole bodies involved. Exoskeleton vests
are changing the game for the American
manufacturing workforce. Ford Motor Company
recently unveiled its plan to provide workers
with wearable technology. REPORTER: It’s an exoskeleton
that helps maintain good posture, adding up
to 15 pounds of support to each arm
when it’s raised up. Nicholas Gotts spends much
of the day on the Ford Mustang
assembly line reaching up. Really? They call you Rocket Man
and Mr. Incredible? Or are you trying
to give yourself a nickname and make it stick by saying it
on national television? Because it doesn’t work
like that, man. Okay? If you want to give yourself
a nickname, you got to be more subtle. Take some advice
from the Chinese stallion. You got to slip it in, when people
aren’t paying attention. W-Wait, wait, wait.
You’re the Chinese stallion? Yeah, I mean, tha-that’s what
I keep hearing people saying these days,
so I guess it’s official. But, more importantly, I don’t know if I trust
that robot vest, okay? I see what’s happening. First, the robot’s like, “Hey, let me help you
lift that.” Then the robot’s like,
“Hey, you know what? I-I can do that myself.
Why don’t you go take a break?” And, next thing you know,
the robot has your job and is banging your wife, okay? And there’s also downsides. Because not only is technology
taking over our lives, it’s about to make us look
a lot stupider. REPORTER: Swiss drone scientists
are working on a wearable drone controller. It’s basically a fancy jacket
with a lot of sensors on it. You put it on and then you add a little virtual reality
headset and then you raise your arms
like a bird, as free as you can be, and, uh, you’ve got to twist
your torso every which way to pilot the drone. Oh, wow. How convenient. So instead of using
a remote control for my drone that fits in my hand, now I just have to put on
20 pounds of equipment? I can’t lift 20 pounds, okay? Do I look like the Rock? Do I? (shouts of assent, cheering) No! No, I don’t. But thank you. (laughter) So, I shouldn’t need
a whole workout routine just to spy on my neighbors
sunbathing on their roof, okay? My problem with this
is that it’s too small-minded. We’re in the future.
We shouldn’t be flying drones. -We should be flying ourselves.
-MAN: Yes! REPORTER: It’s not a sight
you’d expect to see on the streets of London. But few are more blown away
by the jet suit than the man who invented it,
Richard Browning. It’s almost like that dream
most people seem to have around being able to just think
somewhere and fly there. REPORTER: It can reach speeds
of 32 miles an hour and an altitude of 12,000 feet. Anyone can fly it,
with training and insurance. It’s made up
of five mini jet engines, one on the back and two on each
arm, which control direction. Finally. Now, this is
an awesome way to travel, even though he looks like Tony
Stark got his suit from H&M. And… look
at all those engines. I can finally fulfill
my childhood dream of flying and killing
eight geese at once. But as cool as this suit is,
there is one drawback. REPORTER: For now,
the fuel pack limits the suit to only three
or four minutes of flight. (laughter) So this thing can fly up to 12,000 feet but only has gas
for three minutes. That sounds like a great way
to fall from 12,000 feet. But you know what? The good thing
about all this new technology is that we’ve all been worried
that robots are gonna take over and kill humanity. But it turns out
we’re becoming the robots and we’re gonna kill ourselves
first. So, suck it, robots. That’ll
teach you to bang our wives. The Chinese stallion, everybody!

, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

About Author

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *